FAMA 2018

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Great Lakes groups band together to challenge Nestlé and water crises in Flint and beyond

"My grandson that's not here tonight, that's twelve years old, he was to be an academic ambassador to go to Washington in the year 2014 and 2015. Well he was an A-B student but by the time the lead began to corrode his brain, he was no longer an A-B student. He was a D-E-F student," said Bishop Bernadel Jefferson of her grandson, one of the thousands of children affected by the lead poisoning of Flint’s drinking water. Bishop Jefferson, who is with the Flint group CAUTION, was one of the speakers on the Friday night panel of the Water is Life: Strengthening our Great Lakes Commons this past weekend.

Bishop Jefferson has been a pastor for 27 years and an activist for 25 years. She is married with ten children and ten grandchildren. She was one of the first signers of the emergency manager lawsuitagainst Michigan Governor Rick Snyder in 2013. Her passionate talk brought tears to many eyes of the 200 people gathered at Woodside Church for the summit. At the same time her talk energized the audience. Her message of doing this work for all children and the importance of coming together reverberated among the crowd. Bishop Jefferson said of the gathering, "Tonight we make history. We did something they didn't want us to do and that was to come together."

Water justice for Great Lakes communities

Maude Barlow gave an important keynote speech on Friday night on water justice struggles around the world and her work with other water warriors to have the UN recognize the human rights to water and sanitation. Jim Olson from FLOW gave an impassioned talk about Nestle in Michigan and the importance of the public trust. Indigenous lawyer Holly Bird talked about her work with the legal team for Standing Rock, water law from an Indigenous perspective, that governments need to honor the relationships that Indigenous people have with the water and how that can be done without someone controlling or owning water.

Lila Cabbil from the Detroit People's Water Board, who many affectionately call Mama Lila, talked about how the water fights are racialized in Michigan. "The fight we have in Michigan is very much racialized. We need to understand that truth and we need to speak that truth. Because what is happening even as we speak in terms of how Flint and Detroit is being treated would not happen if it was a white community.” She pointed out how the crises are being condoned by the silence of white people. She took a moment to remember late activist Charity Hicks who was a leader in the fight against the shutoffs and who

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Source: Canadians.org

CALL TO THE PEOPLE FOR THE ALTERNATIVE WORLD WATER FORUM - FAMA2018

The Alternative World Water Forum will take place on March 17 – 22th 2018 in Brasilia – Brazil -, at the University of Brasilia’s campus.

It is a democratic event aiming to gather organisations and social movements from all over the world that struggle in defence of water as an elementary right to life.

See here manifesto below.
Click here to see the entities that make up the National Coordination of FAMA (in Brazil)